Plane Wreck - Dive Site

 

Pos
N35.21
E33.32

500m north of a beach close to ESENTEPE sits a lonely rock known as DOMUZ TASI.  100m to the east of that lies the wreck of an aeroplane.  Investigation shows it to be that of a WW2 twin-engine bomber.  Originally thought to be WELLINGTON, an expert from RAF Hendon has suggested that it could be that of a BRISTOL BEAUFORT or BEAUFIGHTER.

  

It is known that in 1944 a squadron of Wellingtons was based in Malta, superseded later that year by Beaufighters, which required less crew.  Photos taken of the wreckage are being studied by experts at both the RAF museum at Hendon and the Imperial War Museum, Duxford.  Hopefully a positive ID will be made based on those photos.

Dive Conditions

The dive boat (a Rib) is boarded from a beach, onshore winds of moderate strength means that there are weather restrictions due to a build up of surf rolling in over a sea bed which consists of boulders making it awkward underfoot. 

A five minute trip in the boat will find you anchoring close to engine number 1.  Generally visibility is very good (is excess of 20 m).  There is usually a westerly current, which varies in strength depending on wind direction.  Water temperature varies from 27 degrees in the summer to about 15 in the winter.  The seabed is mostly Neptune grass with sandy gully areas dotted around.  

The dive

Engine number 1 lies in 12.5 m of water and engine number 2 (14m) and is visible 20m to the east.  A southwesterly heading from engine number 1 for approx 20m will bring you to the machine gun and electrical generator there is also what looks like an air intake for the engine with a large Octopus in residence, no further exploration has been done so as to not disturb this guest.  North from there the bomb can be found in 18m of water, carry on north to find one the engine oil coolers from there Fin north westerly to a depth of 23m and the fuselage can be found in a sandy gulley.  Northeast from there the cockpit section containing throttles, dials and engine controls also comes into view.

Up to now this site has been dived relatively few times, and each dive now seems to produce a new piece of wreckage with much more, we hope, to find.  Because of the size of the area it is very easy to become immersed in discovery so it is very important to watch your air. 

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